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Everything you need to know about buying and selling real estate in Mexico, Puerto Vallarta, and the Banderas Bay region

Ethics, Responsibilities and Best Practices

Questions and Answers about Local AMPI Real Estate

What does the AMPI* Code of Ethics say about loyalty of a real estate professional to his local organization and his colleagues? 

The real estate professional has an obligation to share his experience and knowledge with his colleagues. A real estate professional should not make comments with respect to business actions performed by another Real Estate Professional unless his opinion is official requested. Such opinion must be based on truth and not rumor.

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Mexico Real Estate

4 Priorities for Property Buyers

Insist on a comparative market analysis of the “solds” and a list of the competition on the market for any villa or condo you are considering buying. Don’t take no for an answer. 
Although it is true that historically there has been a history of not recording true sales prices in the Mexican public registry, this doesn’t have to continue, and it is illegal.  You, as a buyer have the right to information before you spend your money. Information of sold data: price, sell date, area, and if there is a mortgage, is important. Traditionally, seller financing commands a higher sales price. Some agencies do not show any properties for sale but their own. 

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My Letter to You

Becoming an Expat in Mexico

Hi, I am Harriet Murray from Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco, México. PV has been my home for 23 years. It was not a planned stay….. I had come to Vallarta for a week in September for almost 10 years before the fateful extra trip in 1996. It occurred to me this time, since I was alone and not distracted by other friends, what would happen if I decided to stay and live, for the first time in my life, outside the USA.  My friends thought I was either crazy, or I would change my mind and not stay any longer than a few more weeks.

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Moving to Mexico

Adjusting to Life in a New Country

If you are living here in Mexico for several months or longer, you will most likely experience at some point a degree of culture shock. Many times, a very simple experience or interchange with a national, can throw you into alienation, confusion, or surprise from encountering unfamiliar surroundings.  This is a normal reaction. You can overcome the feeling by practicing patience and keeping a sense of humor.  You will find that getting enough rest and physically adjusting to the climate goes a long way in your mental attitude in adapting to a different culture and your ability to cope.

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